Inside Analysis

Time To Codify Collaboration

It is time to look more closely at the true nature of where, when and with whom people are working, whether remotely, face-to-face or individually.

Obviously, the growth of mobile devices and the opportunity for web-driven interconnectivity have empowered us all to do more things, in more places in a variety of different ways.

Knowledge-Information Workers

For those of us happy to be classified as so-called Knowledge or Information Workers, this is great news. With desktop (and even mobile) video conferencing a simple and tangible (if not quite ubiquitous) reality, we scarcely need to actually go into the office.

It’s also good news for what we might sensitively define as the blue-collar worker digging the road and laying the bitumen on the freeways and motorways. He or she can also benefit hugely from new workflow management technologies that can be deployed for specific use cases ‘in the field’ today.

These veracities lead us logically onwards to one all encompassing term: collaboration.

Dictionary definitions are always enjoyable to let’s lay one down.

Collaboration (noun): is the state of having shared interests or efforts (as in social or business matters) from 1855 < French < Late Latin collabōrāt 

We now have the opportunity to use software systems that have been directly engineered to bring our work goals together as they also align and manage us towards achieving what should be strategically agreed goals — all, ultimately, for greater business profitability.

Collaboration without integration is just misapplication

But Intel warns us that although collaboration is a powerful term, it is quickly and easily over used. That is to say, collaboration without integration (of data, workflows, strategic business objectives and people themselves) is worth comparatively little.

Collaboration must also now diversify to accommodate for internal and external collaborative information streams across different cloud-based environments – so, put simply, collaboration today is a more complex (and altogether more mobile) overall technology proposition and needs to be undertaken with a defined behavioural strategy behind it.

“In the digitally connected world, an engaging community for customers and partners is a business imperative. However, in order to unlock the true potential of these communities, brands need to deliver user experiences that create meaningful engagements and interactions with their audiences,” said Clara Liang, chief product officer, Jive Software, a communication and collaborations solutions specialist.

A short step to social

Even a brief analysis of new and emerging collaborative technologies is incomplete without bringing in social. We will now construct our most effective collaborative networks using key use-case trends that can be seen to be effective in more consumer-level social environments. This does indeed mean that if an “engagement mechanism” works well on Facebook that it will probably work well in a professional collaborative environment — and the crucial point here, is that mobile will use of the first-choice device for most users.

As now build mobile-collaborative into the fabric of our enterprise communication structures we will see professionals in all industries employing what we might call “specialised social communities” to interconnect and engage with each other.

This is a time of social change. This is a time of collaborative change. This is a time of mobile work method change. This is a time of workflow change.

Like an office, but better

This is an opportunity for all of these forces to coalesce and create mobile collaborative efficiency — it’s almost like just going into the office, but better.

This post is sponsored by itcenterconnect.intel.com

About Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole. Adrian is a regular writer and blogger with Computer Weekly and others covering the application development landscape to detail the movers, shakers and start-ups that make the industry the vibrant place that it is. His journalistic creed is to bring forward-thinking, impartial, technology editorial to a professional (and hobbyist) software audience around the world. His mission is to objectively inform, educate and challenge - and through this champion better coding capabilities and ultimately better software engineering.

About Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole. Adrian is a regular writer and blogger with Computer Weekly and others covering the application development landscape to detail the movers, shakers and start-ups that make the industry the vibrant place that it is. His journalistic creed is to bring forward-thinking, impartial, technology editorial to a professional (and hobbyist) software audience around the world. His mission is to objectively inform, educate and challenge - and through this champion better coding capabilities and ultimately better software engineering.

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