Go to Top

Cloud is a Social Phenomenon, not a Technical Transformation

As every technology literate reader will know, there is little to learn about the cloud computing service-based model of IT delivery from 14th century Sardinian legal codes and laws.

At least, that’s what I thought until I spent a break on the island this weekend and read about the “Carta de Logu” citizens charter of rights, which was laid down somewhere around 1392 by everyone’s favourite late medieval Italian legislator and warrior Marianus IV of Arborea.

The Carta de Logu provided the rights for Sardinian women to refuse marriage and to own property.

… stay with me, we’re almost there.

This decree meant that many Sardinians had an option to buy land, but the men were still fairly bullish and machismo about the way the law was implemented, so many of the women’s purchases had to be confined to coastal areas rather than the interior land, which was rich in farmland and livestock grazing.

Fast-forward 600 years

The world has changed, Sardinian cities are largely confined to coastal areas (for reasons of tourism and trade) and the “matriarchal society” lives on so it looks like the ladies have had the last laugh i.e. connected cities now drive our planet.

Given our new methods of living and working, where globally connected employees operate from city-based hubs as they skip from airport to international airport, we see a new reason for cloud-based connectivity to help facilitate what is now a social phenomenon as much as it is a technological revolution.

Have I stressed the “social” aspect here enough yet? No — not by half. Cloud services underpin (comparatively) still new means of collaboration and communication; just take something as basic as video to illustrate the point.

Iddo Shai is Knowledge and Video Production Manager at open source video platform company Kaltura. Shai contends that we will see a time when webcams will become the new pens as the baby boomers retire and a new generation of completely IT literate users come forward, for whom there has never been a world without cloud based video services such as YouTube.

NOTE: We appear to have started calling YouTube cloud-based rather than Internet-based somewhere around the time of the site introducing its YouTube Video Editor at the turn of the decade.

The cloud creates the knowledge economy

These social changes then — which are undeniably facilitated, underpinned, and accelerated by cloud’s ubiquitous connectivity — lead us into what we like to call the knowledge economy. This state of being is best described as a “hierarchy of networks” where a new type of society individual emerges…

… there is no matriarchal society or sexist machismo in the knowledge-based economy.

Learning and knowledge status for every individual (or group if you wish to extend the theory) is everything; and this in turn then dictates the resulting socio-economic position of individuals and firms as they exist today.

The gathering of the clouds

So to bring these new and still-nascent technologies together and allow our users to truly become these new so-called “knowledge workers” we need to now keep control of our cloud services and bring one central portal experience to bear. With one portal and a singe-sign-on experience users will be able to centralise upon tasks, which may be carried out over multiple cloud environments on different platforms across different form factors which may operate with different latency or other differentiating factors.

Is this one cloud to rule them all? No it’s not. It’s one customisable view of the cloud on any device for the mobile video-enabled new generation. Listen, they have free WiFi in Sardinian airports beating the UK and many other countries. We could all do with a few lessons from the Italian mammas OK?

This post originally appeared on Enterprise CIO Forum.

 

About Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole. Adrian is a regular writer and blogger with Computer Weekly, Dr Dobbs Journal and others covering the application development landscape to detail the movers, shakers and start-ups that make the industry the vibrant place that it is. His journalistic creed is to bring forward-thinking, impartial, technology editorial to a professional (and hobbyist) software audience around the world. His mission is to objectively inform, educate and challenge - and through this champion better coding capabilities and ultimately better software engineering.

About Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole. Adrian is a regular writer and blogger with Computer Weekly, Dr Dobbs Journal and others covering the application development landscape to detail the movers, shakers and start-ups that make the industry the vibrant place that it is. His journalistic creed is to bring forward-thinking, impartial, technology editorial to a professional (and hobbyist) software audience around the world. His mission is to objectively inform, educate and challenge - and through this champion better coding capabilities and ultimately better software engineering.

2 Responses to "Cloud is a Social Phenomenon, not a Technical Transformation"

  • KAW
    August 1, 2012 - 10:24 am Reply

    So from a different – and blatantly sexist – theoretical perspective, one could argue this new knowledge economy is a strategy (by men) to take back the (now) more valuable and desirable real estate formerly tossed to women.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>